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The Common Travel Area: Fragmented, Flexible…Vulnerable?

Imelda Maher (University College Dublin) A mixture of pragmatism, political convenience, and legal obscurity, the Common Travel Area (CTA) dates from the 1920s. It allows British and Irish citizens to travel freely between the two states (and the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) and provides an array of reciprocal ‘rights and privileges’. It does…
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Event Report: Financial Services After Brexit

Elettra Bargellini (Dublin City University) On Thursday 2 December 2021 the DCU Brexit Institute hosted an event on “Financial Services after Brexit”, aiming to explore how the withdrawal of the UK from the EU affects both the future of the city of London and the EU prospects for the development of a capital markets unions. This event…
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The New Czech Government and the Future of Prague-Brussels Relations

Martin Hrabálek & Ondřej Mocek (Mendel University)  The parliamentary elections in the Czech republic held on 8th and 9th October brought a rather unexpected result. The coalition of three parties SPOLU (meaning “together“ in Czech), consisting of the Civic Democratic Party, Christian and Democratic Union – Czechoslovak People’s Party and TOP 09 won the election…
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Germany: Green Light for a New Majority

Ubaldo Villani-Lubelli (University of Salento) On 28 October 1969, Willy Brandt, the renowned Social Democratic chancellor, stated the idea of Mehr Demokratie wagen (Let’s dare for more democracy) in his inauguration speech. By the presentation of the coalition deal of the new government majority after the general election of 26 September, the reference to Willy…
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Phasing Out Fossil Fuel Subsidies After COP26

Goran Dominioni (DCU) Since COP26 came to a conclusion, politicians, analysts and commentators are drawing their conclusions on whether the Glasgow conference has delivered on expectations. One of the key achievements was the agreement to accelerate efforts to phase out inefficient fossil fuels subsidies. Experience, however, shows that progress on eliminating fossil fuel subsidies can…
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Event Report: Law & Politics of Brexit Book Conference 4: The Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland

Elettra Bargellini (Dublin City University) On 18th – 19th November 2021, the DCU Brexit Institute hosted an event, constituting the book workshop preliminary to the publication of Federico Fabbrini (ed), “The Law & Politics of Brexit. Volume 4. The Protocol on Ireland / Northern Ireland” (forthcoming with Oxford University Press), the fourth edition of the Law & Politics of Brexit series.  The conference…
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(Not So) Sweet Sixteen: Boris Johnson’s Untested Weapon in the Fight over the Northern Ireland Protocol

Robert Howse (NYU Law School) “She took everything/Everything I gave her/Oh, sweet sixteen”-Billy Idol In political rhetoric surrounding the implementation of the Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol, especially in the UK, Article 16 on “safeguards” has played a central part. It has been suggested, even at the highest political levels, that invoking or “triggering” Article 16 is…
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Three Great Lies amid the Perfidy over the Protocol

Brendan O’Leary (University of Pennsylvania) The theme of “perfidious Albion” retains vibrancy because the denizens of 65 states annually celebrate their independence from Great Britain. These peoples know that treaty-breaking, threatening to break treaties, and making treaties insincerely, are not novel British activities peculiar to Lord Frost, Brandon Lewis and Boris Johnson.  Lie 1: Perfidy…
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How disputes over the Northern Ireland Protocol can lead to trade wars

Joris Larik (Leiden University) As COP26 wraps up in Glasgow, the UK government may turn its attention from the global stage back to a thorny issue close to home. As its disagreements with the EU over the Northern Ireland Protocol remaining unresolved, the coming weeks will show whether the EU and UK will further harden…
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Commission v Poland (C-204/21 R): Pulverizing the Primacy of EU Law

Renata Uitz (Central European University) On October 27, 2021 the Vice-president of the Court of Justice (CJEU) imposed a periodic penalty of 1M EUR per day on Poland for failing to suspend the application of various legal provisions regarding the Supreme Court’s Disciplinary Chamber [C-204/21 R], as required by an earlier interim order in the…
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Why a Change in Government Won’t Change Norway’s Ambiguous EU Policy

John Erik Fossum (ARENA, University of Oslo) The election campaign On September 13, 2021 Norway held its parliamentary elections. In Norway, parliamentary elections take place at fixed dates, at a four-year interval. The total number of eligible voters was 3,876,200 persons, and the election turnout was 77.2 percent. The election result represents a certain turn…
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L’esprit de l’escalier of Angela Merkel: Her Last European Council

Andrew Duff  As valedictions go, it was a curious affair. German Chancellor Angela Merkel might be forgiven for expecting more from her 107th and last meeting of the European Council (21-22 October). There was no breakthrough on any of the main items of business.  In a four-hour debate on how to deal with the spike…
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Brexit and the Financial Crisis Helped Prepare Ireland for Covid-19

Barry Colfer (Cambridge University, European University Institute) John O’Brennan (Maynooth University) Covid-19 arrived in Ireland in late February 2020 when the first infection was confirmed and within three weeks had spread to every one of the country’s 26 counties. Over the following weeks and months, Ireland, like many other states, faced an existential crisis as…
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Event Report: Differentiated Governance in the Post-Crises EU

Ian Cooper (Dublin City University) On 11-12 October 2021 DCU Brexit Institute hosted the seventh conference of the BRIDGE Jean Monnet Network, which took place online via Zoom. The first day of the conference was devoted to showcasing the work of Ph.D. students affiliated with the BRIDGE network. After welcome remarks from Ken McDonagh, Head of…
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The Quiet European: British defence policy post-Brexit

Daniel Keohane (DCU) At the recent British Conservative Party Conference, new UK Foreign Secretary Liz Truss did not mention “Europe” – let alone the EU, France, or Germany – once in her speech, instead focusing on a “network of liberty” with partners around the world.  Her speech followed the recent announcement of the AUKUS deal,…
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The Polish Constitutional Tribunal Asserts the Primacy of National Constitution over EU Law — In Words with No Legal Force

Renata Uitz (Central European University) After considerable delay, on October 7, 2021 the Polish Constitutional Tribunal rendered its long-awaited ruling in response to Prime Minister Morawiecki’s questions concerning the primacy of EU law in the Polish legal order (K3/21). In response, in a majority decision, the Tribunal asserted the primacy of the Polish Constitution over…
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