BLOG – Brexit and Anglo-Irish Relations

Wither Green Brexit? Northern Ireland’s environment and the new Brexit Deal

Viviane Gravey (Queen’s University Belfast) Another deal, another extension, another general election: recent Brexit developments invite us to revisit what we think Brexit means and the impact it will have on the UK in general and Northern Ireland in particular. This is notably the case for one of the (few) positive surprises of the Brexit process…
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A Backstop for the Backward?

A Backstop for the Backward? Colin Murray (Newcastle University)   A Brexit deal is, on paper at least, done. Michel Barnier solemnly informed the gathered media that the controversial backstop arrangements contained within the draft Withdrawal Agreement’s Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol have been replaced by a new “democratic cornerstone”. The question that remains is whether this…
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 Brexit and Blockchain Technology

This article is the first of a Brexit Institute Blog Series on “Brexit and blockchain technology”, where we aim to assess the impact of blockchain on the Brexit process under various perspectives. Other contributions are going to be featured in the coming weeks.  Brexit and Blockchain Technology     Lory Kehoe (Consensys) A cornerstone of…
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An alternative to the Irish Backstop: an All-Ireland “Common No-Custom Area”

An alternative to the Irish Backstop: an All-Ireland “Common No-Custom Area” as a Frontier Traffic Area under Art. 24 of GATT for products originating in the island (“Ireland-Made”), allowing regulatory divergence by the UK in respect of the EU without necessitating a hard border in Ireland     Giorgio Sacerdoti (Università Bocconi) and Niall Moran…
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Brexit and the future of Fintech  

This article introduces the event “Brexit, the Irish Economy and the Future of European Fintech” that will be hosted by the Brexit Institute at Maldron Hotel Dublin Airport on Monday, 16 September 2019. The event features a keynote speech given by Paschal Donohoe (Minister of Finance of Ireland).     Brexit and the future of Fintech…
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The Irish Border and the Safeguard of the UK Territorial Integrity

The Irish Border and the Safeguard of the UK Territorial Integrity   David Collins (City University) The border in Ireland has emerged as the most significant, perhaps the only remaining barrier to the conclusion of sensible trade arrangements between the UK and the EU post-Brexit. It may also be the main reason why so many…
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No Deal, No Backstop: The Potential Impact on Northern Ireland

No Deal, No Backstop: The Potential Impact on Northern Ireland   Cameron Boyle (Immigration Advice Service) As we hurtle towards our Brexit deadline of the 31st of October, the prospect of leaving without a deal appears increasingly likely. Not only this, but Boris Johnson has now described the Irish backstop – a means of ensuring…
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The Common Travel Area and GATS Art. V

The Common Travel Area and GATS Art. V Charlotte Sieber-Gasser (DCU Brexit Institute) The Common Travel Area and Movement across Borders between Ireland and UK As all of Europe is taking precautionary measures for the scenario of a No-Deal Brexit, let’s take a look at the Common Travel Area (CTA) and its ability to protect free…
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Brexit and the Political Economy of Northern Ireland

Brexit and the Political Economy of Northern Ireland M. Leann Brown (University of Florida) There has been a flood of speculation, analysis, predictions and dire warnings about the possible economic consequences of the secession of the United Kingdom from the European Union for Northern Ireland (NI). Much of this commentary focuses on the possible effects on…
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Facing the Rights and Equality Crisis: Achieving a Bill of Rights for Northern Ireland in the wake of Brexit

Facing the Rights and Equality Crisis: Achieving a Bill of Rights for Northern Ireland in the wake of Brexit Anne Smith (Ulster University) and Colin Harvey (Queen’s University Belfast)   Brexit is giving rise to anxiety about a ‘major constitutional change’ that is creating ‘constitutional uncertainty’, but it has also resulted in a ‘constitutional moment’…
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Brexiting Party Politics in Northern Ireland – Civil Society Alternatives

Brexiting Party Politics in Northern Ireland – Civil Society Alternatives Cillian McGrattan (Ulster University)   The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) topped the poll in the recent Northern Ireland local government elections: 24.1%, an increase of 1% from 2014, compared with its cross-community rival Sinn Fein, which won 23.2%, a decrease of almost 1% from the…
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The Good Friday Agreement and Brexit

The Good Friday Agreement and Brexit Rory O’Connell (Ulster University)   The murder of the journalist Lyra McKee on the eve of Good Friday 2019 is a tragic reminder of the successes and failures of the Peace Process, and the challenges facing it. That her death made international headlines reflects in one sense the success…
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Will Brexit Return Northern Ireland to War or Reinforce the Status Quo?

Will Brexit Return Northern Ireland to War or Reinforce the Status Quo? Carolyn Gallaher and Kimberly Cowell-Meyers (American University, Washington, DC.)   A lot has been written about what Brexit may do to the British economy and its place in the world. People are also finally starting to pay attention to what Brexit may mean for…
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Belated Brexit and Groundhog Talks in Northern Ireland

Belated Brexit and Groundhog Talks in Northern Ireland Cillian McGrattan (Ulster University)   Fumbled Beginnings The latest round of talks in Northern Ireland to restore devolved power-sharing has not begun well. The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) MP, Ian Paisley, for instance, has suggested that Tanaiste Simon Coveney should ‘butt out’ of Northern Irish affairs. Paisley’s…
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‘A Beacon to the World’: The Good Friday Agreement at Twenty-One

‘A Beacon to the World’: The Good Friday Agreement at Twenty-One Donnacha Ó Beacháin (Dublin City University) The Good Friday Agreement, which is 21 years old this month, institutionalised a peace process that has fundamentally altered day-to-day life in Ireland, where an entire generation has grown up without the spectre of violence. The labyrinthine road…
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All-Island Customs Union: No Cure-All for the Irish Border Neither

All-Island Customs Union: No Cure-All for the Irish Border Neither  Charlotte Sieber-Gasser (DCU Brexit Institute) The “All-Ireland Common No-Custom Area” as suggested by Giorgio Sacerdoti and Paola Mariani on this Blog yesterday has its merits: it liberates the UK from the need to remain in a Customs Union with the EU in order to avoid a…
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An alternative to the Irish Backstop? An “All-Ireland Common No-Custom Area” as a Frontier Traffic Area under Art. XXIV GATT for products originating in the island

Giorgio Sacerdoti & Paola Mariani (Bocconi University) This article is a proposal which will be discussed in future blogs. (a) The situation envisaged under the Backstop. Let us first recall the terms of the issue. During the transition period (which will last until, at the latest, December 2022), the UK government will negotiate other future…
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The Future of the All-island Single Electricity Market Post-Brexit

The Future of the All-island Single Electricity Market Post- Brexit Dr. Tanya Harrington (Powerscourt Group)   Introduction The Single Electricity Market (SEM) has a proud 12-year long track-record of delivering secure electricity supplies to citizens on the island of Ireland. It is emblematic of EU energy policy for regional governance in terms of the degree…
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Event Report: Brexit, the Backstop and the Island of Ireland

Event Report: Brexit, the Backstop and the Island of Ireland Alessandro De Nicola  (DCU Brexit Institute) On 13 December 2018, the DCU Brexit Institute, in partnership with the Centre for Constitutional Change (CCC) organized an event on “Brexit, the Backstop and the Island of Ireland”, held at the Helix, in Dublin City University. This event…
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The Irish Backstop Plan: Alternative Routes or Clearer Guarantees?

Upcoming Event, 13 December: Brexit, the Backstop and the Island of Ireland The Irish Backstop Plan: Alternative Routes or Clearer Guarantees? Chloé Papazian (DCU Brexit Institute) The political chaos currently prevailing in Westminster has increasingly exposed the risk of a hard Brexit, namely a withdrawal of the UK from the EU in March 2019 without any deal.…
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Defence, Security and Brexit: Ireland’s Dilemma

Defence, Security and Brexit: Ireland’s Dilemma Kenneth McDonagh (Dublin City University) EU security and defence cooperation has always existed in something of a quantum state – we can know where we are or how fast we’re moving but not both at the same time. In recent weeks both Emmanuel Macronand Angela Merkel have called for versions…
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Brexit and the Great Disruption in UK-Irish Relations

Brexit and the Great Disruption in UK-Irish Relations John O’Brennan (Maynooth University) What we have seen play out in recent weeks in Brussels, Dublin and London is a remarkable ‘reverse asymmetry’ in UK-Irish relations: the historical dynamic of British power over Ireland yielded to the inside-outside asymmetrical logic of the Article 50 negotiations on Brexit:…
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Will a Hard Brexit Lead to a Hard Border? WTO Law and the Backstop

Will a Hard Brexit Lead to a Hard Border? WTO Law and the Backstop Chloé Papazian (Dublin City University) On 7 December 2017, the EU and the UK Government concluded in a Joint Report that they should agree on a so-called ‘backstop’ solution for the Irish border to prevent a border between Ireland and Northern Ireland.…
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Some Reflections on the Current UK and EU Positions on Brexit

Some Reflections on the Current UK and EU Positions on Brexit Chloé Papazian (DCU Brexit Institute) On 20 September 2018, Mr David Lidington, the UK Minister for the Cabinet Office, who is the de facto No 2 in the UK Government’s “chain of command” after Prime Minister Theresa May, visited the DCU Brexit Institute. The Minister…
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The Oireachtas and Brexit

The Oireachtas and Brexit Gavin Barrett (University College Dublin) The Irish parliament has not traditionally been numbered among the stronger parliaments in Europe in exacting accountability in relation to European affairs, either in terms of its institutional strength or its activity level. However, it has over time undergone periodic reform, in particular at the time…
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Brexit, Ireland and the June European Council

Brexit, Ireland and the June European Council Federico Fabbrini Today and tomorrow, 28 and 29 June 2018, the European Council – the body grouping the heads of state and government of the EU member states, together with the President of the European Commission – was due to have a major meeting on Brexit. The meeting…
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Brexit and the Good Friday Agreement IV

Today (April 10) is the 20th anniversary of the Good Friday Agreement. To mark the occasion, the DCU Brexit Institute blog is publishing pieces by several authors on Brexit and the Good Friday Agreement. This is the fourth and final one. See also: Ben Warwick, Rights in Northern Ireland after Brexit: The Devil is in the Detail; Colin Murray, Policing and Security on the Island of Ireland Post-Brexit; David…
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Brexit and the Good Friday Agreement III

April 10 is the 20th anniversary of the Good Friday Agreement. To mark the occasion, the DCU Brexit Institute blog is publishing pieces by several authors on Brexit and the Good Friday Agreement. This is the third. See also: Ben Warwick, Rights in Northern Ireland after Brexit: The Devil is in the Detail; Colin Murray, Policing and Security on the Island of Ireland Post-Brexit; Mary C. Murphy, Reclaiming the…
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Brexit and the Good Friday Agreement II

April 10 is the 20th anniversary of the Good Friday Agreement. To mark the occasion, the DCU Brexit Institute blog is publishing pieces by several authors on Brexit and the Good Friday Agreement. This is the second. See also: Ben Warwick, Rights in Northern Ireland after Brexit: The Devil is in the Detail; David Phinnemore, Protecting the Good Friday Agreement from Brexit: Is the ‘Backstop’ Proposal Enough?; Mary…
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Transport and Trade Implications of Brexit

Transport and Trade Implications of Brexit by Edgar Morgenroth (Dublin City University) While it is generally accepted that Brexit will have a significant impact on UK-EU trade, the precise ways in which trade flows might be impeded is not often discussed. One important area where Brexit is likely to affect goods trade flows is through…
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Inaugural Event “Brexit, Ireland and the Future of Europe”

On January 25, 2018, the DCU Brexit Institute held its Inaugural event on “Brexit, Ireland and the Future of Europe”, organised in partnership with European Movement Ireland and Dublin City University. The event was opened by a Keynote Address by his Excellency Michael D. Higgins, President of Ireland, followed by keynote speeches by Hillary Benn, Chairman of the UK House of Commons Committee on Exiting the EU, and Herman Van Rompuy, first President of the European Council. After a panel of academics and representatives of civil society, the event will be concluded by a final Keynote Address by Simon Coveney, Tánaiste and Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

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Brexit and the British-Irish Relationship

The British-Irish relationship has been typified by close cooperation since the 1980s, culminating in the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. However, Brexit has created challenges and at times the rhetoric between the British and Irish governments has been heated. It was in response to the perceived need to avoid megaphone diplomacy in the 1980s, following the 1982 Falklands War and the 1981 H-Block hunger strikes where 13 hunger strikers died, that the British-Irish relationship was institutionalised in the 1985 Anglo-Irish Agreement. Arguably, Brexit’s challenges justify a commitment to using existing British-Irish institutions more fully or to creating new ones.

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Public Procurement and Brexit: The Risk to Ireland

Public procurement refers to the purchase of goods, works and services by the public sector (and organizations funded in the main through public monies).

In Ireland, as undoubtedly in many other countries, interest in public procurement appears to be inversely related to the fortunes of the economy. In times of economic prosperity the procurement of goods and services by public sector organizations has tended not to be a primary consideration for politicians, policy makers or industry representative groups. However, in recent years public procurement has moved center stage for both the public and private sectors of the economy. For central government, the strategic management of procurement across the public sector has assumed priority status. Expenditure by public sector organizations on a range of goods and services is coming under increasing scrutiny with a view to realizing cost savings.

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Sufficient Progress? Ireland’s Brexit Conundrum

Next week, on 14-15 December 2017 the European Council is set to decide whether sufficient progress has been made in the negotiations on the UK withdrawal from the EU to begin a discussion on the terms of the future relations between the UK and the EU. As is well known, the European Council concluded in October 2017 that, given the uncertainties of the UK Government, not enough progress had taken place by then in the negotiations and that therefore the beginning of phase 2 in the Brexit talks had to be postponed.

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Brexit and the Harmonisation of Corporate Tax

On the 4th October 2017, the European Commission referred Ireland to the European Court of Justice (ECJ) for failing to collect tax debts from Apple, following a Commission decision deeming the tax reliefs provided amounted to a breach of EU Competition Law. Ireland allowed Apple to pay between 0.05% and 2% in tax from 2003 to 2014, which, according to the Commission, amounted to up to €13 billion in illegal state aid. Luxembourg was also referred to the ECJ, after giving Amazon €250 million in tax breaks was also deemed to be illegal state aid. Neither country collected the debt, resulting in the recent referrals, and Ireland has appealed the decision to the ECJ.

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Workshop on Brexit, the Border and the Internal Market

The DCU Brexit Institute hosted an event on “Brexit, the Border and the Internal Market” on 26 October 2017, supported by the European Commission Representation in Ireland. The event addressed the issue of the border between Ireland and Northern Ireland, which is arguably the most sensitive of the three items in the withdrawal negotiations, and considered also questions concerning the access by the UK to the EU internal market post Brexit.

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Brexit and the Irish Border

The question of the location of the de facto border between Ireland and the UK post Brexit has major significance for the future of peace and economic stability on the island of Ireland.
The issue of the border has not yet been resolved, nor is there any indication that there is an obvious preferred solution for the UK Government, although both the EU and the Irish Government and indeed the UK Government have stated a disinclination for a hard land border. It is feared that a hard land border will not only restrict trade on the island but also, and more importantly, destabilize the Good Friday peace process and lead to a new spiral of violence. This gloomy prediction is reinforced by the nature of the political division in Northern Ireland on the referendum.

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