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Human Rights and the Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol

Brian Gormally (Committee on the Administration of Justice) Violent political conflict always means a bonfire of human rights. Conflict on this island has been no exception. Amidst many atrocities committed by state and non-state actors, my organisation, the Committee on the Administration of Justice (CAJ) was founded in 1981 to keep the hope of a…
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Searching for the Silver Lining

Patricia Mindus (Uppsala University) Brexit impacted ‘one of the major achievements of EU integration’: the citizenry of the Union. It shrunk in size, changed in composition, with some of its parts becoming particularly exposed, such as those who have relied on free movement in making their life choices. Many Europeans have seen their residence rights…
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Brexit and Northern Ireland: A role for the US?

Mary C. Murphy (University College Cork) Since the early days of the Troubles, the US has maintained a keen interest in Northern Ireland affairs and US soft power arguably played a role in mediating the conflict. As Brexit (and other domestic issues) appear stuck and seemingly irresolvable, the time may be ripe for the US…
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The evolution of economic anxiety across the Brexit debate

Francesco Carbonero (Fondazione CRC/University of Turin), Jeremy Davies (East Village Consultants), Ekkehard Ernst (ILO), Sayantan Ghosal (Adam Smith Business School), and Leaza McSorley (University of Sunderland) Shocks and uncertainty are on the rise again. After the 2008 global financial crisis, automation and the rise of the gig economy, a revival of populism and nationalism, Brexit…
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The European Parliament to halt Hungary’s state-sponsored discrimination

Renáta Uitz (Central European University) The European Parliament adopted a resolution on July 8, 2021 in response to the Hungarian law that, among others, prohibits the propaganda of homosexuality in media and in education. The new law received considerable attention in Europe, triggering condemnation from both European constitutional actors and several national governments. The Parliament…
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An Evolutionary Explanation of the Next Generation EU Plan

Carlo Garbarino (Bocconi University) The funds of the Next Generation EU plan (“NGEU”), amounting to EUR 750 billion and financed through a debt issue, are now being made available to Member States. The European Council of 17-21 July 2020 had endorsed the agreement of national governments and stated that the Commission shall be empowered in…
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The Legality of the Protocol

Rory Montgomery (Queen’s University Belfast/ Trinity College Dublin) The Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol remains deeply contentious in Northern Ireland, though fortunately since April opposition to it has not contributed to violence. Unionists continue to demand either its abolition, or, at a minimum, a major alteration in its treatment of the movement of goods between Great Britain…
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Brexit and the Rights of EU Citizenship

Willem Maas (York University) From the earliest days of European integration in the postwar period, free movement – of goods, services, capital and people – has been one of the core values and aspirations of the European project. The idea of common European rights, including ultimately a common European citizenship, has also always been part…
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The opportunity of the Slovenian Presidency to the Council of the European Union

Andreja Pegan (Northumbria University/ University of Ljubljana) The EU Slovenian Presidency under the Orban-friendly Janez Jansa is here. That we would see a Jansa led presidency was far from obvious in the preceding months, as the opposition attempted several times to take the helm and form a new government. Despite Jansa’s weak political position with…
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A homophobic law in the EU – What next?

Rita Béres-Deák (Central European University) On June 15th, 2021, the Hungarian Parliament passed the so-called ‘Paedophilia Act’, which bans the ’promotion and portrayal’ of homosexuality and transgender identity to minors, including in education, advertising and the media. Such a law is unprecedented in the EU and runs counter to several EU principles and international human…
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Event Report: The Post-Pandemic EU Political System: State-of-Play Two Years into the New Institutional Cycle

Matteo Bottero (DCU Brexit Institute) On 1 July 2021, the Brexit Institute organised a Policy roundtable entitled “The Post-Pandemic EU Political System: State-of-Play Two Years into the New Institutional Cycle” at, and in collaboration with, the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS) in the framework of the Jean Monnet Network BRIDGE. The event focused on the…
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Next Generation EU: Time to Give the EU Fiscal Power

Ubaldo Villani-Lubelli (University of Salento) The Covid-19 pandemic has opened up major challenges concerning the future political and institutional organisation of the European Union. Among the numerous measures taken by the European Union to counter the economic and social effects of Covid-19, two in particular symbolise a line of conflict between the Member States: the…
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The OECD, EU and United States at the Crucible of Global Taxation

Carlo Garbarino (Bocconi University) An initial agreement by the G-7 finance ministers has been reached in London which satisfies a U.S. demand for a minimum corporate tax rate of at least 15 percent on foreign earnings and paves the way for levies on multinationals in countries other than those where they are headquartered. This is…
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Brexit and the EU’s relations with other European countries

Patrick Bijsmans (Maastricht University) If there is one thing that has become clear during the long years of Brexit negotiations between the EU and the UK, it is that the EU27 – despite their differences – were able to act in a united way when it came to negotiating with a soon-to-be third country. Highlighting…
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Consent and Compromise

Rory O’Connell (Ulster University) A leading UK academic, Vernon Bogdanor, has published a view that the NI protocol was imposed on the people of Northern Ireland without their consent. It is true that Northern Irish MPs voted against the Protocol and that the NI Assembly did not consent to the EU (Withdrawal Agreement) Act 2020.…
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A Federal European Public Prosecution Authority – From Vision to Reality?

Jacob Öberg (Örebro University) The European Public Prosecutor’s Office (EPPO), which has just commenced its operation (EPPO Press Release), is a milestone for EU integration (Öberg, 2021). The fashioning of the EPPO has nonetheless been a contested process, encumbered by very complex political negotiations in the midst of a battleground between intergovernmental and supranational visions…
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The Northern Ireland Protocol: What next for the Democratic Unionist Party?

Henry Jarrett (University of Exeter) What is the Protocol? Despite featuring little in the referendum campaigns of both the Leave and Remain camps, the Northern Ireland border became arguably the most significant sticking point of the Brexit negotiations after the UK voted to leave the EU on 23rd June 2016. The key challenge for the…
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Brexit and UK-EU security cooperation: When politics trumps strategy

Benjamin Martill (University of Edinburgh) and Monika Sus (Hertie School) A security gap With the provisional entry into force of the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA), much has been made of the comparative ‘thinness’ of the agreement negotiated by Boris Johnson compared with the aims of his predecessor, Theresa May. Nowhere is this more…
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